Tuesday, January 29, 2013

Recently, I have been working on a lesson plan about Indiana Physical Characteristics for a third grade class. When typing into Google physical characteristics it provided me with many sites that seemed accurate, but when deciding which site to click on was when I began to struggle. With so many websites that appeared on my screen, I became over whelmed with which one to pick. This made me revert back to our book Understanding Digital Literacies.


Jones and Hafner describe this as "managing information." This describes picking particular data and turning that data into information and knowledge. With so many sites to pick from it may be difficult to find the website that incorporates the data you need, at that time. Why can't we all just have an easy button and then it magically appears on our screen?

I just wish that it would be a lot easier to find information that I need at that moment rather than 10 extra pages of sites that deals with some form of my topic.

8 comments:

  1. Understanding Digital Literacies' point about data, information, and knowledge was very interesting to me. And I agree - there is a flood of data that overwhelms us in general, especially when we use google search or some sort of search engine.

    However, I do think that, like we talked about in class last week I think, we have learned how to sift through google - we often don't go more than a few pages past the first results page, and know (or at least I know) the sort of sites and links I'm looking for.

    Still, there is quite a load of info out there, isn't there?!

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  2. I completely understand how you feel and what you are saying. I run into the same problems when I am trying to create lesson plans. I want to see all these good ideas and suggestions, but I never know which link is going to take me to a useful site. Some link end up taking me on a wild goose chase for this really great activity that you can see a picture of but never actually find how to do. I understand your frustration and I feel it too. I think that there is tons of valuable information out there, I just wish that it was easier to sift through and find what you are looking for.

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  3. Yeah Google can get a little carried away sometimes, especially when your search involves any kind of broad keywords. What I try to do is to just narrow down my actual search phrase to incorporate the only very specific words that are related to what I'm searching for, omitting any vague or broad words that might confuse the search engine. But yeah, I know what you mean, it gets frustrating sometimes. I wish there were more specific search engines for specific topics, so that way you would get the top results for what you're actually looking for.

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  4. Yeah, it definitely can be rather frustrating, but still, I suppose that too much information would be a better situation than too little right? Maybe I'm saying it wrong, but you have to admit that it is a strange situation. But like Ben said up above, just try to use more specific terms, or at least use terms that are a little less vague. I realize that this may not be the most helpful answer, but it's the closest thing to a useful answer that I can give.

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  5. I really liked this blog! I feel exactly the same way! I enjoyed your use of pictures! I found that chapter in the book really interesting as well and I like that you cover it in your blog. I agree with Nathan though, it's probably better than too little information, but I don't think you're necessarily saying that. It does seem that it needs to be better organized!

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  6. I feel your pain Amanda, I have tried using more specific terms when typing something into either Google or Bing's search engines. Even by doing this, it doesn't help give me more specific results. The hardest part about doing research online, is managing your findings and then trying to learn the information that you are given (just like the authors talked about in UDL).

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  7. I completely understand what you are talking about. What gets posted on the internet does not have an sort of pre-screening which decides weather or not it is factual. With that being said, for all of the factual information on the internet, I am sure there is an equal amount of garbage and false information out there. Unfortunately, Google search works by giving you recommendations based off of what other internet users have selected. So if enough people are wrong, then the masses will be recommended to false information about a given topic. Google search can be very helpful, but it could also be the blind leading the blind.

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